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Philippe Jaroussky

Wednesday, August 16, 2017


My Classical Notes

July 16

Hamburg’s New Concert Hall

My Classical NotesIt is definitive news when a new building for the performing arts opens its doors. No, not in the US. Rather, this is a brand new building in Hamburg, Germany. The Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg presented its Grand Opening Concert with performances of the following works: Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 ‘Choral’: Ode to joy Britten: Six Metamorphoses after Ovid for solo oboe, Op. 49 Caccini, G: Amarilli mia bella Cavalieri: La Pellegrina: Dalle piu alte sfere Dutilleux: Mystère de l’instant: Appels, Échos et Prismes Liebermann, R: Furioso for Orchestra Messiaen: Turangalîla Symphony: Finale Praetorius, Jacob: Quam Pulchra es a 5 Rihm: Reminiszenz – Triptychon und Spruch in memoriam Hans Henny Jahnn Wagner: Parsifal: Prelude to Act 1 Zimmermann, B A: Photoptosis – Prelude for large orchestra, with Philippe Jaroussky, Sir Bryn Terfel, Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Pavol Breslik, Hanna-Elisabeth Müller NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester, Ensemble Praetorius, NDR Choir, and the Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Thomas Hengelbrock conducting. The Elbphilharmonie is undoubtedly the new landmark of Hamburg, a monumental combination of breath-taking architecture, a unique location and a world-class concert hall. In this recording, the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra, under the baton of Principal Conductor Thomas Hengelbrock, and several top-class soloists explore the possibilities of the Elbphilharmonie’s Grand Hall and its acoustics with an exciting program that spans across all musical eras, from the Renaissance to the present. It culminates in a brand-new commissioned work, created especially for this occasion by the most important living German composer. BONUS: This documentary accompanies the formation process of this grand building, from the first sketches, to the rehearsals before itS festive inauguration. Here is Gustavo Dudamel, conducting the Symphony number 9 by Beethoven at the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg:

My Classical Notes

May 28

The Tango Music of Piazzolla

My Classical Notes brings you today a review of “The Sound of Piazzolla” The individual tracks are as follows: Piazzólla: Libertango, with Alison Balsom (trumpet) Escualo Alison Balsom (trumpet) Oblivion Martha Argerich (piano) Histoire du Tango: Bordel 1900, withEmmanuel Pahud (flute) Fuga y Misterio, with The 12 Cellists of the Berliner Philharmoniker Adiós Nonino The 12 Cellists of the Berliner Philharmoniker Primavera Porteña, with Daniel Barenboim (piano) Verano Porteño with Daniel Barenboim (piano) Otoño Porteña with David Aaron Carpenter (viola) Invite no Porteño tenTHing Five Tango Sensations: Asleep, with the Alban Berg Quartett Le Grand Tango with Mstislav Rostropovich (cello) La Muerte del Angel Manuel Barrueco Los Pajaros Perdidos Philippe Jaroussky (countertenor) Concierto del angel Tango Ballet Maria de Buenos Aires Suite, with Gidon Kremer All performed by the Kremer Baltica, Kremer Musica, Coral Lirico Buenos Aires Some of the greatest names on today’s classical music scene pay Homage to Astor Piazzolla. Presented in two distinct programs, the first part highlights the most varied of influences: this is not just about the tango; there are influences from jazz and the classical traditions of Bach and Vivaldi, all brought together here. The second part combines original classical compositions – the ‘tango operita’ María de Buenos Aires, the Tango Ballet and Concierto del Angel. The recordings by Gidon Kremer and his KremerATA Baltica are a true piece of Piazzolla pioneer work. In the 1950’s when Astor Piazzolla went to Paris to study classical composition, the tango of his native Argentina was not considered fit for the concert stages of Europe; these were the sultry sounds of the street; the music of the demimonde. Luckily, the formidable composition teacher Nadia Boulanger encouraged her Argentinian pupil to draw precisely on those roots. Piazzolla at last found his true voice as a composer and bandoneon virtuoso. Today, he is considered the father of tango as we know it today, blending rhythmic vitality with orchestral textures. Twenty-five years after Piazzolla’s death, The Sound of Piazzolla confirms that the founder of Tango Nuevo left as his legacy a unique style of music that sounds just as fresh and vibrant today. Here is the music!




The Well-Tempered Ear

February 18

Classical music: Here are the classical music winners of the 2017 Grammy Awards

By Jacob Stockinger This posting is both a news story and a shopping guide for recordings you might like to give or get. It features the classical music winners for the 59th annual Grammy Awards that were announced last Sunday night. Music about the famed American writer Ernest “Papa” Hemingway (below), writing while on safari in Kenya in 1953), with cellist Zuill Bailey, turned out to be a four-time winner for Naxos Records. You can hear the opening movement — titled “Big Two-Hearted River” after the famous short story by Hemingway — in the YouTube video at the bottom. For more information about the nominees and to see the record labels, as well as other categories of music, go to: https://www.grammy.com/nominees On the Internet website, the winners are indicated by a miniature Grammy icon. On this blog they are indicated with an asterisk and boldfacing. As a point of local interest, veteran producer Judith Sherman – who has won several Grammys in the past but not this year – was cited this year for her recordings of the University of Wisconsin-Madison ’s Pro Arte Quartet centennial commissions, Vol. 2. So at least there was a local Grammy nominee, a rare event. Of regional interest, the non-profit label Cedille Records of Chicago won for its recording of percussion music by Steve Reich. And to those Americans who complain about a British bias in the Gramophone awards, this list of Grammy winners shows a clear American bias. But then that is the nature of the “industry” – and the Grammys are no less subject to national pride and business concerns than similar awards in the United Kingdom, France and Germany. At least that is how it appears to The Ear. Anyway, happy reading and happy listening. BEST ENGINEERED ALBUM, CLASSICAL *“Corigliano: The Ghosts of Versailles” — Mark Donahue & Fred Vogler, engineers (James Conlon , Guanqun Yu, Joshua Guerrero, Patricia Racette , Christopher Maltman, Lucy Schaufer, Lucas Meachem, LA Opera Chorus & Orchestra) “Dutilleux: Sur Le Même Accord ; Les Citations; Mystère De L’Instant & Timbres, Espace, Mouvement” — Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, engineers (Ludovic Morlot, Augustin Hadelich & Seattle Symphony) “Reflections” — Morten Lindberg, engineer (Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg & Trondheimsolistene) “Shadow of Sirius” — Silas Brown & David Frost, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer (Jerry F. Junkin & the University Of Texas Wind Ensemble) “Shostakovich: Under Stalin’s Shadow: Symphonies Nos. 5, 8 & 9” — Shawn Murphy & Nick Squire, engineers; Tim Martyn, mastering engineer (Andris Nelsons & Boston Symphony Orchestra ) PRODUCER OF THE YEAR, CLASSICAL Blanton Alspaugh *David Frost (below) Marina A. Ledin, Victor Ledin Judith Sherman (pictured below with a previous Grammy Award. She came to Madison to record the two volumes of new commissions for the centennial of the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Pro Arte Quartet) Robina G. Young BEST ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCE “Bates: Works for Orchestra” — Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor (San Francisco Symphony) “Ibert: Orchestral Works” — Neeme Järvi, conductor (Orchestre De La Suisse Romande) “Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5 In B-Flat Major, Op. 100” — Mariss Jansons, conductor (Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra) “Rouse: Odna Zhizn; Symphonies 3 & 4; Prospero’s Rooms” — Alan Gilbert, conductor (New York Philharmonic) *“Shostakovich: Under Stalin’s Shadow – Symphonies Nos. 5, 8 & 9” (below) — Andris Nelsons, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra) BEST OPERA RECORDING *“Corigliano: The Ghosts of Versailles” (below) — James Conlon, conductor; Joshua Guerrero, Christopher Maltman, Lucas Meachem, Patricia Racette, Lucy Schaufer & Guanqun Yu; Blanton Alspaugh, producer (LA Opera Orchestra; LA Opera Chorus) “Handel: Giulio Cesare” — Giovanni Antonini, conductor; Cecilia Bartoli, Philippe Jaroussky, Andreas Scholl & Anne-Sofie von Otter; Samuel Theis, producer (Il Giardino Armonico) “Higdon: Cold Mountain” — Miguel Harth-Bedoya, conductor; Emily Fons, Nathan Gunn , Isabel Leonard & Jay Hunter Morris; Elizabeth Ostrow, producer (The Santa Fe Opera Orchestra; Santa Fe Opera Apprentice Program for Singers) “Mozart: Le Nozze Di Figaro” — Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor; Thomas Hampson, Christiane Karg, Luca Pisaroni & Sonya Yoncheva; Daniel Zalay, producer (Chamber Orchestra of Europe; Vocalensemble Rastatt) “Szymanowski: Król Roger ” — Antonio Pappano, conductor; Georgia Jarman, Mariusz Kwiecień & Saimir Pirgu; Jonathan Allen, producer (Orchestra of the Royal Opera House ; Royal Opera Chorus) BEST CHORAL PERFORMANCE “Himmelrand” — Elisabeth Holte, conductor (Marianne Reidarsdatter Eriksen, Ragnfrid Lie & Matilda Sterby; Inger-Lise Ulsrud; Uranienborg Vokalensemble) “Janáček: Glagolitic Mass” — Edward Gardner, conductor; Håkon Matti Skrede, chorus master (Susan Bickley, Gábor Bretz, Sara Jakubiak & Stuart Skelton; Thomas Trotter; Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra; Bergen Cathedral Choir, Bergen Philharmonic Choir, Choir of Collegium Musicum & Edvard Grieg Kor) “Lloyd: Bonhoeffer” — Donald Nally, conductor (Malavika Godbole, John Grecia, Rebecca Harris & Thomas Mesa; the Crossing) *“Penderecki Conducts Penderecki, Volume 1” — Krzysztof Penderecki, conductor; Henryk Wojnarowski, choir director (Nikolay Didenko, Agnieszka Rehlis & Johanna Rusanen; Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra; Warsaw Philharmonic Choir) “Steinberg: Passion Week” — Steven Fox, conductor (The Clarion Choir) BEST CHAMBER MUSIC/SMALL ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE “Fitelberg: Chamber Works” — ARC Ensemble “Reflections” — Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg & Trondheimsolistene “Serious Business” — Spektral Quartet *“Steve Reich”— Third Coast Percussion “Trios From Our Homelands” — Lincoln Trio BEST CLASSICAL INSTRUMENTAL SOLO “Adams, John.: Scheherazade.2” — Leila Josefowicz; David Robertson, conductor (Chester Englander; St. Louis Symphony) *“Daugherty: Tales of Hemingway” — Zuill Bailey (below); Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor (Nashville Symphony) “Dvořák: Violin Concerto & Romance; Suk: Fantasy” — Christian Tetzlaff; John Storgårds, conductor (Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra) “Mozart: Keyboard Music, Vols. 8 & 9” – Kristian Bezuidenhout “1930’s Violin Concertos, Vol. 2” – Gil Shaham; Stéphane Denève, conductor (The Knights & Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra) BEST CLASSICAL SOLO VOCAL ALBUM “Monteverdi” — Magdalena Kožená; Andrea Marcon, conductor (David Feldman, Michael Feyfar, Jakob Pilgram & Luca Tittoto; La Cetra Barockorchester Basel) “Mozart: The Weber Sisters” — Sabine Devieilhe; Raphaël Pichon, conductor (Pygmalion) *“Schumann & Berg” (below top) — Dorothea Röschmann; Mitsuko Uchida, accompanist (tied) *“Shakespeare Songs” (below bottom) — Ian Bostridge; Antonio Pappano, accompanist (Michael Collins, Elizabeth Kenny, Lawrence Power & Adam Walker) (tied) “Verismo” — Anna Netrebko; Antonio Pappano, conductor (Yusif Eyvazov; Coro Dell’Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia; Orchestra Dell’Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia) BEST CLASSICAL COMPENDIUM *“Daugherty: Tales of Hemingway; American Gothic; Once Upon A Castle” — Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer “Gesualdo” — Tõnu Kaljuste, conductor; Manfred Eicher, producer “Vaughan Williams: Discoveries” — Martyn Brabbins, conductor; Andrew Walton, producer “Wolfgang: Passing Through” — Judith Farmer & Gernot Wolfgang, producers; (Various Artists) “Zappa: 200 Motels – The Suites” — Esa-Pekka Salonen, conductor; Frank Filipetti & Gail Zappa, producers BEST CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL COMPOSITION “Bates: Anthology of Fantastic Zoology” — Mason Bates, composer (Riccardo Muti & Chicago Symphony Orchestra) *“Daugherty: Tales of Hemingway” — Michael Daugherty (below), composer (Zuill Bailey, Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony) “Higdon: Cold Mountain” — Jennifer Higdon, composer; Gene Scheer, librettist (Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Jay Hunter Morris, Emily Fons, Isabel Leonard, Nathan Gunn & the Santa Fe Opera) “Theofanidis: Bassoon Concerto” — Christopher Theofanidis, composer (Martin Kuuskmann, Barry Jekowsky & Northwest Sinfonia) “Winger: Conversations With Nijinsky” — C. F. Kip Winger, composer (Martin West & San Francisco Ballet Orchestra) Tagged: 59th Annual Grammy Awards , accompanist , Alan Gilbert , Alban Berg , America , Andris Nelsons , Antonio Pappano , Arts , Augustin Hadelich , ballet , Baroque , Bergin , bias , blog , Bonhoeffer , Boston , Boston Symphony , Cecilia Bartoli , Cedille Records , Cello , Chamber music , Chamber Orchestra of Europe , choral music , Classical music , Compact Disc , concerto , David Robertson , Dmitri Shostakovich , Dutilleux , Early music , Edvard Grieg , Essa-Pekka Salonen , France , Frank Zappa , George Frideric Handel , Germany , Ghosts of Versailles , Gil Shaham , Grammy , Grammy Award , Grammy Award for Album of the Year , Grammy Award for Record of the Year , Gramophone , Great River Shakespeare Festival , Greig , Hemingway , homeland , Ian Bostridge , icon , Internet , Jacob Stockinger , Janacek , Jennifer Higdon , John Adams , John Corigliano , Keyboard , Krzysztof Penderecki , Leila Josefowicz , local , Madison , Mariss Jansons , mass , Michael Daugherty , Michael Tilson Thomas , Mitsuko Uchida , motel , Mozart , Music , Nashville , Naxos Records , Neeme Jarvi , New York Philharmonic , Nijinsky , Norway , opera , Orchestra , percussion , Piano , Poland , Pro Arte Quartet , producer , Prokofiev , regional , San Francisco , San Francisco Symphony , Santa Fe , Schumann , Seattle Symphony , Shakespeare , short story , Shostakovich , sing , singer , Sonata , song , St. Louis Symphony Orchestra , Stalin , Steve Reich , Stuttgart , symphony , tale , Texas , The Knights , Thomas Hampson , trio , UK , United Kingdom , United States , University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music , University of Wisconsin–Madison , vaughan williams , Viola , Violin , vocal music , Warsaw , Wisconsin , Yannick Nézet-Séguin , YouTube , Zappa , Zuill Bailey

The Well-Tempered Ear

December 10

Classical music: Here are the classical music nominations for the 2017 Grammy Awards. They make a great holiday gift list of gives and gets

By Jacob Stockinger This posting is both a news story and a holiday gift guide of classical recordings you might like to give or get. It features the classical music nominations for the 59th annual Grammy Awards that were just announced this past week. As you can see, several year ago, the recording industry decided that the Grammys should put more emphasis on new music and contemporary composers as well as on less famous performers and smaller labels as well as less well-known artists and works. You don’t see any music by Bach, Beethoven or Brahms this year, although you will find music by Mozart, Handel, Schumann and Dvorak. And clearly this is not a Mahler year The winners will be announced on a live TV broadcast on Sunday night, Feb. 12, on CBS. BEST ENGINEERED ALBUM, CLASSICAL “Corigliano: The Ghosts of Versailles” — Mark Donahue & Fred Vogler, engineers (James Conlon , Guanqun Yu, Joshua Guerrero, Patricia Racette , Christopher Maltman, Lucy Schaufer, Lucas Meachem, LA Opera Chorus & Orchestra) “Dutilleux: Sur Le Même Accord ; Les Citations; Mystère De L’Instant & Timbres, Espace, Mouvement” — Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, engineers (Ludovic Morlot, Augustin Hadelich & Seattle Symphony) “Reflections” — Morten Lindberg, engineer (Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg & Trondheimsolistene) “Shadow of Sirius” — Silas Brown & David Frost, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer (Jerry F. Junkin & the University Of Texas Wind Ensemble) “Shostakovich: Under Stalin’s Shadow: Symphonies Nos. 5, 8 & 9” — Shawn Murphy & Nick Squire, engineers; Tim Martyn, mastering engineer (Andris Nelsons & Boston Symphony Orchestra) PRODUCER OF THE YEAR, CLASSICAL Blanton Alspaugh David Frost Marina A. Ledin, Victor Ledin Judith Sherman (pictured below with the Grammy Award she won last year. She came to Madison to record the double set of new commissions for the centennial of the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Pro Arte Quartet) Robina G. Young BEST ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCE “Bates: Works for Orchestra” — Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor (San Francisco Symphony). You can hear excerpts in the YouTube video at the bottom. “Ibert: Orchestral Works” — Neeme Järvi, conductor (Orchestre De La Suisse Romande) “Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5 In B-Flat Major, Op. 100” — Mariss Jansons, conductor (Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra) “Rouse: Odna Zhizn; Symphonies 3 & 4; Prospero’s Rooms” — Alan Gilbert, conductor (New York Philharmonic) “Shostakovich: Under Stalin’s Shadow – Symphonies Nos. 5, 8 & 9” (below) — Andris Nelsons, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra) BEST OPERA RECORDING “Corigliano: The Ghosts of Versailles” (below) — James Conlon, conductor; Joshua Guerrero, Christopher Maltman, Lucas Meachem, Patricia Racette, Lucy Schaufer & Guanqun Yu; Blanton Alspaugh, producer (LA Opera Orchestra; LA Opera Chorus) “Handel: Giulio Cesare” — Giovanni Antonini, conductor; Cecilia Bartoli, Philippe Jaroussky, Andreas Scholl & Anne-Sofie von Otter; Samuel Theis, producer (Il Giardino Armonico) “Higdon: Cold Mountain” — Miguel Harth-Bedoya, conductor; Emily Fons, Nathan Gunn , Isabel Leonard & Jay Hunter Morris; Elizabeth Ostrow, producer (The Santa Fe Opera Orchestra; Santa Fe Opera Apprentice Program for Singers) “Mozart: Le Nozze Di Figaro” — Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor; Thomas Hampson, Christiane Karg, Luca Pisaroni & Sonya Yoncheva; Daniel Zalay, producer (Chamber Orchestra of Europe; Vocalensemble Rastatt) “Szymanowski: Król Roger ” — Antonio Pappano, conductor; Georgia Jarman, Mariusz Kwiecień & Saimir Pirgu; Jonathan Allen, producer (Orchestra of the Royal Opera House ; Royal Opera Chorus) BEST CHORAL PERFORMANCE “Himmelrand” — Elisabeth Holte, conductor (Marianne Reidarsdatter Eriksen, Ragnfrid Lie & Matilda Sterby; Inger-Lise Ulsrud; Uranienborg Vokalensemble) “Janáček: Glagolitic Mass” — Edward Gardner, conductor; Håkon Matti Skrede, chorus master (Susan Bickley, Gábor Bretz, Sara Jakubiak & Stuart Skelton; Thomas Trotter; Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra; Bergen Cathedral Choir, Bergen Philharmonic Choir, Choir of Collegium Musicum & Edvard Grieg Kor) “Lloyd: Bonhoeffer” — Donald Nally, conductor (Malavika Godbole, John Grecia, Rebecca Harris & Thomas Mesa; the Crossing; below) “Penderecki Conducts Penderecki, Volume 1” — Krzysztof Penderecki, conductor; Henryk Wojnarowski, choir director (Nikolay Didenko, Agnieszka Rehlis & Johanna Rusanen; Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra; Warsaw Philharmonic Choir) “Steinberg: Passion Week” — Steven Fox, conductor (The Clarion Choir) BEST CHAMBER MUSIC/SMALL ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE “Fitelberg: Chamber Works” — ARC Ensemble “Reflections” — Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg & Trondheimsolistene “Serious Business” — Spektral Quartet “Steve Reich ” — Third Coast Percussion (below) “Trios From Our Homelands” — Lincoln Trio BEST CLASSICAL INSTRUMENTAL SOLO “Adams, J.: Scheherazade.2” — Leila Josefowicz; David Robertson, conductor (Chester Englander; St. Louis Symphony) “Daugherty: Tales of Hemingway” — Zuill Bailey; Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor (Nashville Symphony) “Dvořák: Violin Concerto & Romance; Suk: Fantasy” — Christian Tetzlaff; John Storgårds, conductor (Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra) “Mozart: Keyboard Music, Vols. 8 & 9” – Kristian Bezuidenhout “1930’s Violin Concertos, Vol. 2” – Gil Shaham; Stéphane Denève, conductor (The Knights & Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra) BEST CLASSICAL SOLO VOCAL ALBUM “Monteverdi” — Magdalena Kožená; Andrea Marcon, conductor (David Feldman, Michael Feyfar, Jakob Pilgram & Luca Tittoto; La Cetra Barockorchester Basel) “Mozart: The Weber Sisters” — Sabine Devieilhe; Raphaël Pichon, conductor (Pygmalion) “Schumann & Berg” — Dorothea Röschmann; Mitsuko Uchida, accompanist “Shakespeare Songs” — Ian Bostridge; Antonio Pappano, accompanist (Michael Collins, Elizabeth Kenny, Lawrence Power & Adam Walker) “Verismo” — Anna Netrebko; Antonio Pappano, conductor (Yusif Eyvazov; Coro Dell’Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia; Orchestra Dell’Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia) BEST CLASSICAL COMPENDIUM “Daugherty: Tales of Hemingway; American Gothic; Once Upon A Castle” — Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer “Gesualdo” — Tõnu Kaljuste, conductor; Manfred Eicher, producer “Vaughan Williams: Discoveries” — Martyn Brabbins, conductor; Andrew Walton, producer “Wolfgang: Passing Through” — Judith Farmer & Gernot Wolfgang, producers; (Various Artists) “Zappa: 200 Motels – The Suites” — Esa-Pekka Salonen, conductor; Frank Filipetti & Gail Zappa, producers BEST CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL COMPOSITION “Bates: Anthology of Fantastic Zoology” — Mason Bates, composer (Riccardo Muti & Chicago Symphony Orchestra) “Daugherty: Tales of Hemingway” — Michael Daugherty, composer (Zuill Bailey, Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony) “Higdon: Cold Mountain” — Jennifer Higdon, composer; Gene Scheer, librettist (Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Jay Hunter Morris, Emily Fons, Isabel Leonard, Nathan Gunn & the Santa Fe Opera) “Theofanidis: Bassoon Concerto” — Christopher Theofanidis, composer (Martin Kuuskmann, Barry Jekowsky & Northwest Sinfonia) “Winger: Conversations With Nijinsky” — C. F. Kip Winger, composer (Martin West & San Francisco Ballet Orchestra) Tagged: 59th Annual Grammy Awards , Andreas Scholl , Andris Nelsons , Anna Netrebko , Anne-Sofie von Otter , Antonín Dvořák , Antonio Pappano , Arts , Bach , ballet , Baroque , Bassoon , Berg , Bonhoeffer , Bonhoffer , Boston Symphony , CBS , CBS-TV , Cecilia Bartoli , Cello , Chamber music , choral music , Christian Tetzlaff , Christopher Rouse , Christopher Theofanidis , Classical music , Cold Mountain , Compact Disc , concerto , David Frost , David Robertson , Early music , Frank Zappa , George Frideric Handel , Gesualdo , Gil Shaham , Grammy , Grammy Award , Grammy Award for Album of the Year , Grammy Award for Record of the Year , Handel , Hemingway , Henri Dutilleux , Ian Bostridge , Ibert , Jacob Stockinger , Janacek , Jennifer Higdon , Johann Sebastian Bach , John Adams , John Corigliano , Josef Suk , Judith Sherman , Karol Szymanowski , Keyboard , Leila Josefowicz , Los Angeles , Ludwig van Beethoven , Madison , Mahler , Manfred Eicher , Mason Bates , mass , Michael Daugherty , Michael Tilson Thomas , Mitsuko Uchida , Monteverdi , motel , Mozart , Nashville , Nathan Gunn , New York Philharmonic , Nijinsky , opera , Orchestra , Patricia Racette , Penderecki , percussion , Piano , Pro Arte Quartet , Prokofiev , Romance , Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra , San Francisco Symphony , Santa Fe Opera , Schumann , Seattle Symphony , Shakespeare , Shostakovich , singer , Sonata , songs , St. Louis Symphony , Stalin , Suite , symphony , tenor , The Ghosts of Versailles , The Knights , The Recording Academy , Thomas Hampson , trio , TV , United States , University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music , University of Wisconsin–Madison , vaughan williams , Verismo , Violin , Violin concerto , vocal music , Warsaw , Wisconsin , Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart , Yannick Nézet-Séguin , YouTube , Zuill Bailey



parterre box

May 12

The other Valkyrie

While D.C. Wagnerians wait for Nina Stemme’s Brünnhilde to arrive next week, “Trove Thursday” presents the erstwhile Valkyrie of another compelling diva: Anna Caterina Antonacci as Brunehild, the heroine of Ernest Reyer’s Sigurd, a French grand opera also based on the Nibelungenlied. //www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vsbl6q_g4gk The fascinating Antonacci recently collaborated with Yannick Nézet-Séguin on the Wesendonck Lieder, but she hasn’t yet ventured any Wagner heroines. However, in 2013 she headlined this rare concert performance in Geneva of Sigurd opposite rising tenor Andrea Carè in the title role. Although Sigurd had to wait until 1884 for its first performance in Brussels, it was completed well before then and was thus written contemporaneously with some of Wagner’s Ring. The plot of Götterdammerung mirrors that of Reyer’s work, although Hilda (Sigurd’s Gutrune) is a much more active player and Attila (!) hovers off-stage. The opera quickly reached the United States in 1891, but it has never been performed at the Met although one of Sigurd’s arias was sung by tenor Albert Saléza at an 1899 concert. I’ve been unable to track down the date or location of the most recent US performance of Sigurd, but it might be an ideal work for Leon Botstein to revive at Bard SummerScape. There was a brief burst of interest in Sigurd in France in the mid-1990s when it was performed in Montpellier with Chris Merritt in the title role and then in Marseille with Françoise Pollet as Brunehild. It was staged just last year in Erfurt, but otherwise Reyer’s ambitious opera remains best known—if at all—via excerpts recorded by singers from Georges Thill and Germaine Lubin to Régine Crespin to Roberto Alagna and Bryan Hymel. A complete French radio performance from the early 1970s conducted by Manuel Rosenthal and featuring Andrea Guiot, Guy Chauvet and Robert Massard has circulated over the years on both tape and CD. Reyer: Sigurd Genève 8 October 2013 Broadcast Brunehild: Anna Caterina Antonacci Hilda: Anne Sophie Duprels Uta: Marie-Ange Todorovitch Sigurd: Andrea Carè Gunther: Boris Pinkhasovich Hagen: Tijl Faveyts Un prêtre d’Odin: Khachik Matevosyan Un barde: Nicolas Courjal Rudiger: Nicolas Carré Orchestre de la Suisse Romande Conductor: Frédéric Chaslin As befits an epic, Sigurd is over two-and-a-half hours long, so if you want to download it or last week’s Purcell-fest with Scholl and Jaroussky, just go to this link in iTunes or find them via any RSS reader.

parterre box

May 5

Double treble

Tomorrow evening Philippe Jaroussky performs songs set to poems by Paul Verlaine at the Morgan Library and in several weeks Andreas Scholl returns to New York for two recitals of English music at the Park Avenue Armory. The concerts are nearly sold out, so “Trove Thursday” presents these two star countertenors in a beguiling all-Purcell program from 2010. In addition to being one of England’s greatest composers, Henry Purcell was also a countertenor and he wrote some exquisite music for that voice, both solos and duets. One used to only hear Purcell performed by British artists but that has thankfully changed although such wonderful recordings as Les Arts Florissants’s The Fairy Queen have been criticized as “Frenchifying” the music. Scholl has made an excellent Purcell recording with Accademia Bizantina where his countertenor partner is Christophe Dumaux, and there’s a Jaroussky Purcell recording with L’Arpeggiata but I’ve avoided it as I dislike Christina Pluhar’s music-making. But this concert from Brussels brings together Scholl and Jaroussky in a rare and happy collaboration. Today’s posting also seems a fitting way to mark the fifth anniversary of my first (or rather DeCaffarrelli’s) piece for Parterre Box—a review of a CD reissue of Hasse’s Cleofide that features four countertenors! Purcell Arias, Songs & Instrumental Pieces December 2010 Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels Andreas Scholl Philippe Jaroussky Ensemble Artaserse If you want to download Andreas and Philippe or last week’s Freischütz with Jonas or any previous “Trove Thursday” fare, just go to this link in iTunes or find them via any RSS reader.

Philippe Jaroussky

Philippe Jaroussky (13 February 1978) is a French sopranist countertenor. He began his musical career with the violin, winning an award at the Versailles conservatory and then took up the piano before turning to singing. He is noted for a virtuosic coloratura technique and for compelling and enlivened interpretations of baroque cantatas and operas. Jaroussky was inspired to sing by the Martinique-born countertenor Fabrice di Falco. He received his diploma from the Early Music Faculty of the Conservatoire de Paris. Since 1996, he has studied singing with Nicole Fallien. He has formed his own ensemble called Artaserse, and also often performs with the Ensemble Matheus under Jean-Christophe Spinosi and with L'Arpeggiata under Christina Pluhar.



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Caldara In Vienna Forgotten Castrato Arias Vivaldi Carestini

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